Tag Archives: dr boyce watkins

What Beyonce’s Pregnancy Says about Single and Married Black Women

what beyonce's pregnancy says about black single mothers

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, Your Black World

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Were African Americans Thrown Under the Bus During the Debt Ceiling Debate?

Dr. Wilmer Leon and Dr. Boyce Watkins ask whether or not African Americans were harmed disproportionately by the latest debt ceiling debate.

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Did the CIA Help Cause Drug and Gang Violence in Black America?

From Dr. Boyce Watkins – Scholarship in Action 

“For the better part of a decade, a San Francisco Bay Area drug ring sold tons of cocaine to the Crips and Bloods street gangs of Los Angeles and funneled millions in drug profits to a Latin American guerrilla army run by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, a Mercury News investigation has found.

This drug network opened the first pipeline between Colombia’s cocaine cartels and the black neighborhoods of Los Angeles, a city now known as the "crack" capital of the world. The cocaine that flooded in helped spark a crack explosion in urban America . . . and provided the cash and connections needed for L.A.’s gangs to buy automatic weapons.” – San Jose Mercury News, 1996

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Dr. Watkins Interview on Why College Athletes Should Get Paid

With March Madness approaching, Dr. Boyce Watkins did a recent interview regarding the details on how and why college athletes should be paid.  The interview is below:

1.  If college athletes are to be paid for their performance, how do you decide who is paid and who is not?

The market can decide who gets paid.  That’s how coaches find out who earns $2 million per year vs. those who earn just $500k.  Better performers typically get paid more money on a job, so why should it be any different for athletes?

2. How do you decide how much to pay them? Is it enough to provide for their families and some for extra activities, or is it solely based on something like jersey sales, winning record, etc.?

I don’t think any of us should decide how much to pay someone – no one "decides" that Rick Pitino is worth $2 million per year.  He negotiates and the highest bidder gets his services.  I am a believer that athletes should have access to the same fair market that their coaches receive.  To argue differently is to imply that coaches are more important than athletes or that they deserve better treatment.  This is a classist and racist thing to believe.

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The Latest from Dr. Boyce Watkins – 1/13/11


Brought to you by The Great Black Speakers Bureau, the #1 Black Speakers Bureau in the world.  To join the Your Black World Coalition, please visit YourBlackWorld.com.  To follow us on Twitter, click here.  To follow us on Facebook, click here.

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Black Women, Mass Incarceration and the Market for Finding a Husband

Dr. Boyce on NPR: What Obama Needs to do For Black People

Dr. Boyce on NPR: What Obama Needs to do For Black People

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Dr. Boyce Watkins Spotlight: Rev. Jesse Jackson Talks Money, Prisons, Black Issues

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Obama Speech Tucson: Memorial Hits a Homerun in a Polarized Nation

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Tavis Smiley: The Good, the Bad and the Interesting of Smiley’s Coming Forum on Obama, Politics

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Writer Who Asked If the Church Keeps Black Women Single Has Some Answers: Dr. Boyce Spotlight

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Crosshairs: Company Attacks Palin, Says Obama Should Not Speak to O’Reilly During the Super Bowl

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F. Lee Bailey Says He Believes O.J. Murder Was a Drug Hit

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Dr. Boyce Watkins Spotlight: News Anchor Cheryl Wills Teaches Empowerment Through Book, ‘Die Free: A Heroic Family Tale’

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3 Things Obama Must Address for Black People

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Dr. Boyce Watkins Spotlight: Keri Hilson on Money Management & Social Media Brand Building

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On Founder’s Day, Delta Sigma Theta Is Sitting on Millions of Dollars

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Dr. Boyce and Lola Adesioye Talk about the Black Agenda

by Lola Adesioye, Huffington Post – www.LolaCreative.com

Should there be a "black agenda" in America? And if the answer to that question is ‘yes,’ what is the black agenda?

These are the questions that black leaders and black people have been discussing more and more since President Obama took office. Last week, Reverend Al Sharpton hosted a leadership summit addressing this very issue. Today a group of black leaders got together on an MSNBC special to talk about this issue in more detail. And many will remember the on-air argument that Tavis Smiley and Rev Sharpton had a few weeks ago about this topic.

Tavis believes that Obama isn’t doing enough. Sharpton believes that Obama need not ‘ballyhoo’ a black agenda. I think most agree, though, that something needs to be done.

With a 16.5% unemployment rate (compared to 9.7% for white Americans), an education system that is under serving black children, higher than average rates of death from diseases like breast cancer, and continued social issues, it is hard to disagree that there is need for some kind of targeted and focused approach to dealing with the issues that affect African-American. But many are divided on whether or not the president is doing enough for black people, whether or not it’s incumbent on him to do anything at all, and what should or shouldn’t be done.

 

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Dr. Boyce Watkins on AOL Black Voices – 2/25/10

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Cornel West Goes Questions Barack Obama’s Commitment to Black People

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Man Who Allegedly Threw Baby From Bridge Charged With Murder

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Judge Mathis Calls Prison System Modern-Day Slavery

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‘Twilight Star’ Robert Pattinson a Racist?

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Woman Lied about Gang Rape, Gets Three Years in Prison

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Three Officers Acquitted in New York Sodomy Case

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Teaching Your Kids about Money: Dr. Boyce

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FBI Believes Kwame Kilpatrick Ran a Criminal Enterprise

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Old White Man Beats Young Black Man on Bus: Video Storms the Web

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Wesley Snipes Talks on Man who Crashed Plane into IRS Building

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Rapper Shyne Signs $1 Million Dollar Deal with Def Jam

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Judge Tells Chris Brown That He’s Doing a Great Job on Probation

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Woman Faces $555,000 Dollars in Student Loan Debt: Dr. Boyce Money

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Man Allegedly Throws Baby Off a Bridge in New Jersey

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Sean Bell’s Shooters Are Not Going to be Charged with a Crime

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Boyce Watkins on AOL Black Voices – 1/23/10

The Latest

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Beyonce and Jay-Z Dominate The Richest Couples List

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Haitian Earthquake Kills Two Leaders of Women’s Movement

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Beyonce, Madonna Added to Haiti Relief in Big Concert

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Wyclef Jean Did Not Misuse Yele Haiti Funds, Experts Say

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Clark Atlanta University Accused of Fraudulently Violating Rights of Faculty Members

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NAACP Embezzlement Case Leads to Charges Being Filed

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Report: Economically, Men Benefit More from Marriage Than Women

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Barack Obama is No Martin Luther King: Let’s Figure Out the Difference

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Haitian Violence Slows Aid Process: Death Toll Higher than Expected

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Wyclef Jean Gets Questioned on Use of Yele Haiti Funds

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Kelis Holds Nas in Contempt for Non-Payment of Child Support

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US Insurers Have Very Little Exposure to Haitian Earthquake

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Rush Limbaugh says Negroes Served Ted Kennedy Booze

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Morehouse Whiz Kid is Causing a Stir: 13-Year-Old Dominates College

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Michael Eric Dyson: Obama ‘Runs from Race Like a Black Man Runs from a Cop’

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Dr. Boyce on Black Planet – 12/28/09

OPINION: Black Males Plagued by Wrongful Convictions

By Dr. Boyce Watkins December 29, 2009 10:30 am

OPINION: Black Males Plagued by Wrongful Convictions

Read more about OPINION: Black Males Plagued by Wrongful Convictions

TAGS: black men, Eric Holder, justice system, Prison

OPINION: Police Who Shot Unarmed Man Must Be Held Accountable

By Dr. Boyce Watkins December 28, 2009 2:15 pm

OPINION: Police Who Shot Unarmed Man Must Be Held Accountable

Read more about OPINION: Police Who Shot Unarmed Man Must Be Held Accountable

TAGS: Police brutality

OPINION: Tiger’s Wife Wants Half? That Would Be Insane

By Dr. Boyce Watkins December 22, 2009 11:30 am

OPINION: Tiger’s Wife Wants Half?  That Would Be Insane

Read more about OPINION: Tiger’s Wife Wants Half? That Would Be Insane

TAGS: sex scandals, Tiger Woods

OPINION: Florida State, NCAA Steal Education from Black Athletes

By Dr. Boyce Watkins December 21, 2009 10:32 am

OPINION: Florida State, NCAA Steal Education from Black Athletes

Read more about OPINION: Florida State, NCAA Steal Education from Black Athletes

TAGS: black athletes, education, NCAA

OPINION: Man Exonerated after 35-Years Should Be Given Recourse

By Dr. Boyce Watkins December 18, 2009 10:45 am

OPINION: Man Exonerated after 35-Years Should Be Given Recourse

Read more about OPINION: Man Exonerated after 35-Years Should Be Given Recourse

TAGS: Eric Holder, justice system, Prison

OPINION: Tavis Smiley Should Not Be Working With R. Kelly

By Dr. Boyce Watkins December 16, 2009 5:18 pm

OPINION: Tavis Smiley Should Not Be Working With R. Kelly

Read more about OPINION: Tavis Smiley Should Not Be Working With R. Kelly

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Cynthia McKinney’s Open Letter to Syracuse University about Dr. Boyce Watkins

 

Chancellor Cantor:

I write this letter with fond memories of interactions with the wonderful students at Syracuse University.  While on your campus, I found the students to be both thoughtful and welcoming:  perfect for a university campus.

I write to lend my full support for Dr. Boyce Watkins and his tenure application at Syracuse University.  Dr. Watkins has raised the profile of Syracuse University as he informs our national community on money matters as well as matters of the conscience.  And at this particular time in our country’s history, financial literacy must be viewed as an important life skill.  Dr. Boyce is doing for America what he does in Syracuse University classrooms every class meeting period.  So why would Syracuse University not want such a prolific and publicly appealing face as its representative?

Ultimately, Dr. Boyce must be judged by what he does in the classroom and in publications.  Does Dr. Boyce elevate Syracuse University and does he elevate his field?  Dr. Boyce demonstrates "academics in action" and makes scholarship relevant.  Why should Dr. Boyce’s scholarship and activism (which elevates Syracuse University) not be rewarded by a grant of tenure from Syracuse University?

As a former Member of Congress and Green Party candidate for President of the United States, I realize that political complexities can play a role in the decision to grant tenure to faculty on most American campuses. As I have just concluded successful organizing against war that brought together four 2008 Presidential candidates, I am reminded of the clean break that Dr. King had to make with his friends of the civil rights movement when he decided to speak out against the Vietnam War.  But Dr. King intoned that he had been fighting segregation too long to segregate his moral concerns.  Your decision with respect to Dr. Boyce is both political and moral.  And so, I will end with one very famous Dr. King quote and hope that the leadership of Syracuse University will do in this decision what is right:

"Cowardice asks the question – is it safe?
Expediency asks the question – is it politic?
Vanity asks the question – is it popular?
But conscience asks the question – is it right?
And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular; but one must take it because it is right."

Sincerely,
Cynthia McKinney


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Black Kids Told to Pick Cotton in front of white classmates

I received a call the today from CNN for an appearance on Headline News with the amazing Richelle Carey. The story happened a couple of weeks ago, but it took me aback and I thought I would quickly share it with the AOL BV family. During a field trip to a former plantation in Charlotte, NC, the tour guide wanted to show the kids what slavery was like. So, he asked the black children to pick cotton while their white classmates stood around and watched. When the CNN producer (a nice woman named Ebony) told me about the story, I had to do a Gary Coleman imitation: "What choo talking bout Ebony?"
Beyond the obvious, this case is disturbing on a multitude of levels. But CNN has asked me to help make this case into a teachable moment. I love finding life lessons in everything, so here are some quick thoughts:

1) The tour guide who did this clearly wasn’t thinking: If you want the children to empathize with slavery, why not have them ALL pretend to be slaves? If you have the black children pretending to be slaves and the white kids pretending to be their masters, you are only teaching the white kids to be slave masters and the black kids to be their property.
2) Look at this through the mind of a child: I remember a child in elementary school saying to me, "I wish slavery was still around, because I could then tell you what to do." Those were the same words that Walter Currie’s classmate said to him beforespraying him with gasoline and setting him on fire. Those were also the words that one child said to another on the bus ride home from the plantation that day in North Carolina. Do you see a trend here? While we as adults might see the educational value in our remarks, children might see it in an entirely different way.

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Dr. Boyce: Setting the Record Straight on Heather Ellis

Setting the record straight with Heather Ellis

 

Jury selection for Heather Ellis continues
Heather Ellis case one in a long line of Missouri’s racial injustices

This Nov. 4, 2009 file photo shows Heather Ellis, left, arm-in-arm with her mother, Hester Ellis, exiting the Stoddard County Justice Center in Bloomfield, Mo. (AP Photo/Corey Noles, Dexter Daily Statesman, File)

This week, for the first time, I had the chance to speak with Heather Ellis.

Heather was not previously allowed to speak, since her attorney told her to remain silent. I can tell you that after speaking with Heather for nearly two hours, she is a fine young woman. She is NOT the kind of person who needed to spend any time in prison, and I am glad she took the plea deal from the prosecution. Let me explain a few facts about the case that you may not know:

1) Heather is not admitting guilt: Anyone familiar with the criminal justice system in America should understand that there are times when you have to plead in order to make something go away. There was no smoking gun implicating Heather Ellis; there was only the risk that the jury (which her high powered attorney, Scott Rosenblum, considered to be the worst jury he’d seen in 26 years of practice) was going to send her to prison or jail.

Like most of us, Heather is not a person who wants to go to jail for any significant period of time. I personally worried that she would be abused if left in the presence of the very officers who’d attacked her on the night of her arrest, not to mention the criminals she would be incarcerated with. If she were my daughter, I would have told her to take the plea.

The good thing was that her fight led the entire nation to talk about issues that we would never have discussed otherwise. Anyone who doesn’t agree with her decision needs to go put their own child on trial with up to 15 possible years in prison and see how much yapping you do then.
2) There is no evidence of an assault on an officer and she was not convicted of these felonies: According to Heather (whom I believe and I’ll tell you why in a second), there was one police officer who was dead set on the idea of pursuing and harassing her. He followed her closely out of the store, referring to her as a b*tch and a ho. He then told her to "go back to the ghetto." That is when Heather turned and asked him why he was harassing her instead of chasing real criminals. That is when he said, "Because I want to harass your stupid a**." That is also the officer who, without warning, tackled Heather and dragged her to the police car.

The reason Heather’s story is credible is because this officer had been fired from another job for sexual harassment and had lied on the witness stand in the past. Her attorney’s research uncovered the officer’s dirty past, and Heather discussed this issue in more detail in our conversation.
3) This was not a jury of her peers: Heather’s father, Pastor Nathaniel Ellis, told me that he had wanted to push the trial to the very end. What changed his mind, he said, was seeing his daughter break down in tears over the idea of going to jail or prison.

 

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NCAA May Hire a Black President? Who Cares

NCAA

by Dr. Boyce Watkins

I am not a fan of the NCAA, a sports league that earns money on the par of the NFL and NBA, but has somehow decided that they don’t have to properly compensate their employees or give them standard rights to negotiation. What’s worse is that the NCAA does tremendous harm to the African American community, sucking up kids with hoop dreams and destroying their futures with inferior educations.

When I recently read that the NCAA may be hiring a black president (Dr. Bernard Franklin), the only thing I could say is “whoopty-damn-doo.” While some of us might be tempted to applaud such an achievement, we must fully understand that the disease of racism is sometimes delivered through the hands of a black overseer.

RELATED: OPINION: Ivy League Can Teach NCAA About Coach Diversity

Dr. Franklin, while running around the country applauding his organization for giving one opportunity to one black person, should probably think of the thousands of African American families being used up by the very system he has been trained to manage. The NCAA is, without question, one of the most exploitative regimes in the history of America, right next to slavery and the prison system. Billions are earned each year off the backs of African American families, while the league has worked together with Congress to create a nexus of regulations that keep the athlete and his/her family from getting a piece of the economic pie.

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Dr Boyce: the Meghan Williams Story is Unbelievable

Megan Williams' story is simply unbelievable

  • Megan Williams, left, and her mother Carmen Williams stand outside of the Logan County Courthouse Thursday, March 13, 2008, in Logan, W.Va. (AP Photo/Jeff Gentner)

Megan Williams, an African-American woman who was allegedly raped, tortured and kidnapped by a group of seven white men in West Virginia two years ago at the age of twenty is now claiming that she was playing with our minds. It is a shock to hear that Williams is now saying that the story is a lie, a complete fabrication. She is set to recant her story in a press conference today.

The stomach-turning story that involved drinking urine and eating human feces while being raped repeatedly and subjected to racial slurs was something she apparently made up for fun. If Williams were playing with our heads, I only wish she’d come up with a less disgusting way to do it. The problem is that the prosecutor, Brian Abraham, isn’t buying Williams’ new story, and neither am I.

The prosecutor’s position is that he did not convict the defendants based solely on Williams’ testimony. Abraham has stated in published reports that he learned early on that Williams tends to exaggerate and embellish details, perhaps due to the fact that Williams has been described as being "mentally slow."

Abraham also claims that he did what any good prosecutor should do: achieve a conviction based on physical evidence and the defendants’ statements. If there is evidence that a sexual assault occurred and proof that Williams endured kidnapping and torture, such evidence should certainly outweigh the significance of any statements made by Williams. There are also other possibilities in this case, such as the chance that Williams may be receiving threats that have pressured her to change her testimony.

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Rapper Nas Has Tax Trouble

by Dr. Boyce Watkins 

Hip Hop Wired is reporting that the rapper Nas is having some serious financial problems. In addition to owing his wife Kelis $44,000 per month in child support, it turns out that the artist also owes the federal government another $2.5 million in taxes. Here are quick thoughts about Nas, love and money:

1) Nas has a complicated life. His decision to marry the "love of his life" is going to cost him for the rest of his life. The rapper’s tax situation could be due to irresponsibility (as appears to be the case with Method Man and Nicolas Cage), or it could simply be a matter of using write-offs that were not allowed by the IRS. We can’t assume that Nas’ tax trouble automatically makes him into a horrible citizen.

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Eddie Griffin – Going for Broke

by Dr. Boyce Watkins 

I had a lot of fun watching the new Vh-1 show, "Going for Broke," starring comedian Eddie Griffin. Griffin is one of the funniest comics in America, the comedian that Chris Tucker could have been (if he would simply stop disappearing between Jackie Chan movies).

On the show, Griffin gives insight into his personal life, which is both intriguing and disturbing. The show is called "Going for Broke" for a reason, because Eddie just might actually get there.
Here are some reasons that Eddie Griffin might actually become the broke celebrity that he is trying to become:

1) He spends like a damn fool. One of the easiest traps for an entertainer to fall into is the "infinite money trap." That’s when the person thinks that they’ve got an endless supply of cash, giving them ability to spend whatever they want on whatever they want. Apparently Eddie may have fallen into this trap, since his Bentley was being repossessed in an early episode of the show. Eddie’s conversation with his accountant was also revealing, as the words "all the accounts are empty" seemed to strike him hard. With all the success that Eddie Griffin has had, it is difficult to imagine that he would be completely broke. But the truth is that this kind of thing happens all the time.

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Obama’s Racial Catch-22

Race is Obama's Catch-22

    Demonstrators protest on Capitol Hill in Washington, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009, during a taxpayer rally. The Washington Monument is in the background. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

A few years ago, Dr. Cornel West wrote an outstanding book called "Race Matters." In the book, he explains why a post-racial America is not yet a reality. Race certainly matters in our nation, and we don’t need to look any further than the anti-Obama lynch mobs to find evidence of this fact.

What is most interesting is that the people who hate Obama for being black don’t even realize that this is the reason they hate him. That’s how the social sickness called "racism" sneaks into the very fabric of the social infrastructure on which our country operates.

President Obama’s recent experience is yet another reminder that the disease of racism has its greatest impact on those who think they’ve been cured. In spite of his continuous efforts to "just get along" with those on the right wing, they have insisted upon engaging in some of the most pathetic, thug-like behavior imaginable, creating a climate unlike anything our country has seen in the last 30 years.

If you think this has nothing to do with Obama being black, you need to open a history book. Lynch mobs rarely attacked a black man just for being black. They attacked him for being black and doing something that white people found to be unacceptable.

Click to read on MSNBC’s TheGrio.com.

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Rev. Al and Dr. Boyce Discuss Serena, Kanye and Race

Were there any racial implications to the recent outbursts by Serena Williams and Kanye West? Yes, there were. In my latest conversation with Rev. Al Sharpton, we break down these interesting events, all of which occurred during the past week. We can agree, however, that there are certainly things more important than worrying about Serena Williams and Kanye West. But these situations, in light of the backdrop of Obama’s comments about Kanye, might provide true teachable moments regarding America’s tattered racial history.As I’ve written before, Serena and Kanye have a lot in common, but nothing in common, all at the same time. Serena’s actions were justifiable, given the intensity of the situation and the fact that the line judge made the wrong call. At the same time, most of us can agree that Serena went over the line by threatening to "shove the ball down the f**ing throat" of the line judge because of her mistake. Yes, Serena, you are from the hood. But you don’t need to take it back to the hood to make your point to a U.S. Open line judge.

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Dr Boyce Watkins on MSNBC’s TheGrio – 8/26/09

about Dr. Boyce Watkins

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Dr Boyce on the cover of MSNBC.com

Teddy was a lion for civil rights

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, Syracuse University  – MSNBC’s TheGrio.com

(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, FILE)

Many of us once joked that Bill Clinton was the "first black president" (which he wasn’t). We had it wrong. If such a title were to be given to any white man, that should have to be the late Senator Ted Kennedy. He was never president of the United States, but he was certainly one of the kings of his generation.

As a member of the Senate since 1962, Senator Kennedy had a long career fighting for those forced to live in the underbelly of a capitalist society. Over the last 47 years, he has done it better than nearly any politician in American history. African-Americans were among the many beneficiaries of his passionate life’s work, and for that, we will always be appreciative.

In a multitude of areas including housing, income, civil liberties, and equality, Ted Kennedy has been on the front lines. His brother John introduced the Civil Rights Act of 1964, considered to be one of the most impactful pieces of legislation ever produced by our government. After John’s death, Ted and his brother Robert were instrumental in seeing that the bill was passed.

Senator Ted Kennedy then went on to help pass one law after another to support the rights of the elderly, the sick, the poor and the incarcerated. He introduced the Americans with Disabilities Act, The Civil Rights Act of 1991, The Civil Rights for Institutionalized Persons Act, among others. He also helped to amend the Fair Housing Act, and has fought relentlessly for those who’ve never known the comfort of attending an Ivy League University.

Senator Kennedy’s political compassion, as well as his complicated coping mechanisms, may be linked to the tragedy he experienced during his life. As a young child, he watched his sister Rosemary endure a failed lobotomy, saw his brother Joseph die in World War II and then witnessed his older sister Kathleen’s death in a plane crash. This tragedy was compounded by the assassinations of his two brothers, Robert and John during the 1960s. This kind of pain doesn’t heal easily, and few families endure such an amazing amount of personal tragedy. It is quite possible that the weight of his psychological pain gave Senator Kennedy the ability to empathize with the struggles of others, as well as the strength to fight through hurdles presented by his adversaries.

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