Category Archives: Black Women

YourBlackWoman.blogspot.com is a page for black women to talk about the issues that affect black women. Your Black World is a website that allows black people to discuss the issues that matter most to African Americans.

Many of our writers have been writers and personalities for some of the largest television networks including, CNN, Fox, BET, ESPN, ABC, NBC, etc. We also discuss many black issues and events, such as black greeks: AKA, Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi (Q – Dogs), step shows, black college students, black men, black life, black sports, black hollywood, black celebrities etc.

Some of our favorite black female celebrities include: Oprah Winfrey, Halle Berry, Wendy Williams, Serena Williams, Venus Williams, Queen Latifah, Tyra Banks, Winny Mandela, Toni Morrison, Star Jones, Michelle Obama, Maya Angelou, Donda West,
Cynthia McKinney, Condoleeza Rice, Thandie Newton, Angela Bassett, Gabriel Union, Nia Long, Sanaa Lathan, Regina King, Pam Grier, Vanessa Williams, Whoopi Goldberg, Jada Pinkett Smith, Kerry Washington, Hattie McDaniel, Cicely Tyson, Tamala Jones, Dorothy Dandridge, Lonette McKee, Vivica A. Fox, Zoe Saldana, Kimberly Elise ,Stacey Dash, Elise Neal, Sheila Frazier, Taraji P. Henson, Naomi Harris, Rosario Dawson, Angelle Brooks, Heather Headley, Ruby Dee, Porter McKenna Posey, Paula Patton

The Latest from Dr. Boyce – 6/15/10


Brought to you by The Great Black Black Speakers Bureau, the #1 Black Speakers Bureau in the world.  To join the Your Black World coalition, please visit YourBlackWorld.com.

Hey peeps,

Rev. Al Sharpton and I are going to be on MSNBC Thursday morning at 10 am – don’t forget that you can also hear us on his radio show every Monday at 1:15 pm EST (SharptonTalk.net).  Also, to all the high school graduates out there, I want to encourage you to do the following:  1) Value education more than anything – it’s probably the most important thing you’ll ever have (so get as much of it as you can), 2) Pursue your goals relentless – working consistently toward something for 5 – 10 hours a day will always yield results, 3) Think like bosses, not laborers – get a great job, but eventually work to put yourself in a position to create jobs by owning your own business and financial assets,  4) Remember that life is a journey of love – money and career mean very little compared to how you treated the people you care about.  Life is too short to be mediocre – always do your best.

Dr. Boyce

 

Post Image

Dr. Boyce Video — What the Hayell? What Is Wrong With T-Pain?

Post Image

Former NBA Star Antoine Walker Faces 12 Years in Prison

Post Image

Dr. Boyce Video: Images of the Black Woman in Media and Business

Post Image

Black Male Sets Trends in Finance: Houston Has More than Rappers

Post Image

Why the Hip-Hop Industry Doesn’t Support Female Artists

Post Image

Financial Lovemaking: Diddy’s Son Gets $360K Car — Too Much?

South African Horns Criticized During World Cup

Video thumbnail. Click to play
Click to Play

What do the Vuvuzelas sound like – are they really that bad?

Posted by Staffat 9:32 PM0 comments

Anita Baker Accused of Butchering the National Anthem

Video thumbnail. Click to play
Click to Play

What do you think? ;

Posted by Staffat 9:23 PM0 comments

Rapper Vigalantee Raps about Black Women

Video thumbnail. Click to play
Click to Play

Check out the new joint by Vigalantee, celebrating the black woman.

Posted by Staffat 9:15 PM0 comments

Did This Officer Just Punch this Black Woman in the Face?  Was this Police Brutality or Resisting Arrest?

Video thumbnail. Click to play

Click to watch

Post Image

Slim Thug Attempts to Defend His Comments about Black Women

Post Image

NFL Player Reggie Wayne Sues Mistress for Charging Up Credit Card

Dr. Boyce: How the Lakers-Celtics Rivalry Saved the NBA Both 30 Years Ago and Today

"Boyce Watkins"The NBA finals are not what you think.  You see, you’re watching the finals hoping that either the Lakers or the Celtics win, and wondering whether Kobe Bryant can outscore Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett and the army of tall brothers that Boston is flying across the country to conquer Los Angeles.  That is not, my friends, the first thing on the mind NBA Commissioner David Stern.

First of all, Stern is wondering why LeBron James isn’t here.  Most of us expected, to the disdain of every other talented player in the league, that this would be the year that LeBron would take his rightful place on the Post-Jordan throne.  The natural and inevitable coronation of King James was part of the NBA marketing strategy, thus allowing Stern and company to make even bigger money in the Chinese market, where the fans want to see their All Stars become champions.  As we all know, it didn’t happen.

The second thought on Stern’s very sharp mind is that the finals he got this year, a renewal of the historic rivalry between the LA Lakers and Boston Celtics, is just as good, or better than what he would have gotten had King James shown up to play.  You see, there’s history here, and most of the relevant history isn’t about wins and losses on the court.

Click to read.

Post Image

NJ Officer Taped Spraying Pepper Spray in Detained Black Man’s Face

Post Image

Brian McKnight Ruled to Have Fathered 14-Yr Old: Owes $341,640: All About Black Daddies

What does Barack Obama Have in Common with 50 Cent?

Video thumbnail. Click to play
Click to Play

Check out Barack & Curtis, a new documentary by Byron Hurt

Posted by Staffat 12:38 PM0 comments

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

Paterson NJ Cop Videotaped While Macing a Black Man

Video thumbnail. Click to play
Click to Play

This video is storming the web – a cop in Paterson, NJ is caught on tape macing a black man on the ground. ;


The Age of the Hoochie Mama is Over:  It’s Time for Hip Hop to Grow Up

Lil Wayne disrespects women because he’s allowed to.

In 2004, the women at Spelman College told the rapper Nelly to take a hike for sliding a credit card through a woman’s backside. The women told Nelly to take his music elsewhere, and his concert was cancelled. I thought that after this incident, women across America would slide their own credit card in the other direction, away from the record stores and websites used to purchase music from artists who make it their mission in life to disrespect black women. I have to admit that I was wrong.

What has always amazed me is the fact that we have trained young people to endure and embrace consistent disrespect from rappers like Slim Thug, who recently stated that white women are a far better choice for relationships, and Lil Wayne, who has done everything in his power to show just how little regard he has for African American females. Wayne even has a song called Alphabet B*tches, which isn’t exactly like the ABCs you learned in preschool. For some reason, we all keep dancing to the beat and showing up for concerts, reminding the artist that freedom of speech is in full effect, no matter how harmful that speech may be. 

Click to read.

This message was sent from Dr. Boyce Watkins: Your Black World to bwatkins@twcny.rr.com. It was sent from: Dr. Boyce Watkins, 23F Queens Way, Camillus, ny 13031. You can modify/update your subscription via the link below.

Email Marketing by
iContact - Try It Free!

To be removed click here

Leave a comment

Filed under black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

Images of Black Women in Media: Dr. Boyce Show

Dr. Boyce Watkins Show – AOL

Today I had the opportunity to speak with four interesting and empowered black women: Michaela Angela Davis(founding Editor of Vibe Magazine), Christina Mendez (well-known plus size model), Dr. Catrice Austin (owner of VIP Smiles, Celebrity dentist), and Alisha Crutchfield(celebrity stylist and Fashion Director for the Miss Universe pageant).

 

Click to read

Leave a comment

Filed under black speakers, Black Women, Hip Hop, Public intellectuals

Why Are Women Excluded from Hip Hop?

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, Syracuse University

I met spoken-word hip hop artist Shanelle Walker when I went to give a speech atKentucky State University. Shanelle sent me a video of a rhyme she recited in honor of President Barack Obama. I was instantly floored by the performance, since I found her to be an incredibly powerful artist.
But Shanelle’s performance led me to consider broader concerns, such as why there are so few women in the hip-hop industry. I remain confused that women are not given a chance to shine in a field dominated by men. While hip-hop has historically been the channel designed to give a voice to urban America, women have been effectively left out. While I’ve certainly spoken my piece on how hip hop needs to change, here are some reasons I believe women are missing:
1) The hypermasculinity of hip-hop: By becoming so masculine and sexualized, the music doesn’t give women opportunities that don’t involve a G-string. I look forward to the day when the culture is not driven by who gets shot the most and who does the best job of proving that he’s a goon. That might actually lead to better music, since right now, many hip-hop artists come off like World Wrestling Entertainment characters. It’s O.K. for an artist to also be a human-being.

 

Click to read

Leave a comment

Filed under black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women, boyce watkins

It’s Time for Hip Hop to Grow Up – Dr. Boyce

The age of the Hoochie Mama is over

by Dr. Boyce Watkins | TheLoop21 in Culture & Society

It’s time for hip hop, and its audience, to grow up.

read more

Leave a comment

Filed under black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women, boyce watkins

Dr. Julianne Malveaux on Financial Reform

Financial Reform-The Devil’s In The Details

By Julianne Malveaux

Late last week, the United States Senate passed a financial reform bill by a vote of 59-39. Two Democrats crossed party lines, as did four Republicans to come up with the result. Now, the House, which has already passed financial reform legislation, and the Senate, will have to reconcile their versions of the bill. Now is the time for consumer advocates and others to counter the aggressive lobbying that will be done by banks and the auto industry to minimize the effects of legislation. This may also be an opportunity for the Congressional Black Caucus to raise its voice on the side of the many consumers who have been damaged by this financial crisis. While legislation is not meant to look backwards, but instead forward to prevent future crises, the CBC are among those who advocate for the least and the left out. Their perspective on financial regulation is badly needed.

The House would create a consumer protection agency that is freestanding; the Senate would house the agency inside the Federal Reserve Bank. In some ways having the Fed run consumer protection is like having the fox patrol the chicken coop. Isn’t this the same Fed that was part and parcel of the 2008 financial meltdown, the same Fed (then led by Alan Greenspan) that turned a blind eye to predatory and sub-prime lending and the market distortions that emerged from the packaging of substandard loan paper? The Federal Reserve theoretically already deals with regulation around credit cards and mortgages and to date they’ve not done a good job. What will change when they now have a consumer protection agency? Hearings, anyone?

Click to read more

Leave a comment

Filed under black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

Should Black Women Be Offended by Kagan’s Nomination?

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, Syracuse University

To the disappointment of the Black Women’s Roundtable, Elena Kagan was the latest white American to leapfrog in front of black women for a chance to serve on the Supreme Court. The second-class citizenship of African American women has been consistently enforced by our nation, going back 221 years to the date that the Supreme Court was founded. This nomination was especially disheartening for those who felt that the year of Dorothy Height’s death would be the perfect time for the nation’s first black President to do what should have been done long ago and nominate a black woman for the highest court in the land.

"Needless to say, we are disconcerted by the perceived lack of real consideration of any of the extremely qualified African American women as potential nominees," reads the statement released by the Black Women’s Roundtable.
After this is over, President Barack Obama will have serious trouble re-inspiring the millions of African American women who left the Hillary Clinton camp to back his "Hope and change" campaign. There was no logical reason for him to pass over a black woman for consideration for this post, only political reasons. Kagan was the nominee that could shore up the white female vote for mid-term elections and help the Obama Administration and the Democratic Party stop the bleeding set to occur in November. Roland Martin does a wonderful job of breaking down the losses within the black female demographic that are set to occur as a result of the Kagan snub on the Supreme Court.

 

Click to read

Leave a comment

Filed under african american professors, African American Scholars, african american speakers, black motivational speakers, Black News, black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women, boyce watkins

Should the NAACP Have Taken Money from Wells Fargo? Dr. Boyce and Ben Jealous Give their Points of View

theGRIO SPEAKS

Leave a comment

Filed under Black News, black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

Are Black Women Victims of a Bad Dating Situation?

sdkldklssdklsd

by Lola Adesioye, Huffington Post

Over the past few months, black women and their relationships – or should I say, lack thereof – have been getting a lot of attention. The Washington Posthas done a couple of features on it. Then ABC’sNightline did a show asking why there are so many single black women.

All of a sudden the mainstream media is taking a keen interest in our love lives. We are being told that there is a ‘crisis’ amongst black women, particularly educated professional women, who are apparently unable to find a ‘decent’ black man.

Last night, ABC continued once again, with the airing of "Why Can’t a Successful Black Woman Find a Man?," a taped discussion featuring Hill Harper, Steve Harvey, The View’s Sherri Shepherd and others.

There’s no doubt that it’s a topic that sparks heated debates and discussions amongst black women and men. It has for years. But is it really that bad? Or is the media – now that it has found a hot topic – exploiting this issue for all that it’s worth? I’m an educated black woman and I personally have no problem with meeting eligible, educated, great black men. Whether or not I choose to date them is another thing, but they are out there.

I am somewhat perturbed by the slew of stories on this topic. They are negative, unhelpful and only serve to perpetuate negative ideas about black men and women which often become self-fullfiling. They basically say ‘oh, poor black women. They try so hard yet can’t find a decent man … Boo hoo, black women are victims. Ooh, it’s all the fault of those pathetic black men. You know, they have no education or are locked up in jail.’ Sorry, but I do not subscribe to that view.

 

Click to read

Leave a comment

Filed under Black News, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

Dr. Boyce on ABC News: Financial Questions You Should Ask Your Partner

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, Finance Professor – Syracuse University

As a Finance Professor, I find it incredibly ironic that many people get married without talking about money. They talk about every kind of compatibility from emotional, to spiritual, sexual, and professional, but they seldom take the time necessary to ensure that they can tolerate the idea of sharing their financial life with a person who may not be on the same page. This problem is compounded in black relationships, where many women describe economic hurdles as one of the reasons that black women have trouble finding the right mate.

 

Click to read more

Leave a comment

Filed under african american professors, African American Scholars, african american speakers, Black News, black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

The Latest from Dr. Boyce on AOL Black Voices – 4/19/10

 

Post Image

Harvard’s Charles Ogletree Describes Sharpton’s Link to Obama

Post Image

The Black Agenda: Wealth-Building Must Top the List – Dr. Boyce Money

Post Image

Officer Charged With Beating a Motorist

Post Image

Financial Lovemaking: Tiger, Tiki and the High Cost of Cheating

Post Image

Jay-Z Sues Red Sox Slugger David Ortiz Over 40/40 Club Name

Post Image

Bill O’Reilly Gets Booed at Sharpton’s National Convention

Post Image

President Obama Spends $18 Billion on Jobless Benefits

Post Image

Police May Have Coerced Boys to Confess to Gang Rape of 7-Year-Old

Post Image

Former NAACP President Benjamin Hooks Dead at 85

Post Image

Man With HIV Knowingly Infected Women, Set to Be Released From Prison

Post Image

Kennedy Family Member Staying in Prison on Murder Conviction

Post Image

Mississippi Gov. Says Slavery Conversation is Not Important

Post Image

NBA Star Derrick Coleman is Now Broke: $87 Million Up in Smoke

Post Image

Michael Steele Tries to Explain Himself to Other Republicans

Post Image

Suspects Found in Slaying of Newlywed Couple

Leave a comment

Filed under Black Men, Black Money, Black News, black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

Dr. Boyce and Lola Adesioye Talk about the Black Agenda

by Lola Adesioye, Huffington Post – www.LolaCreative.com

Should there be a "black agenda" in America? And if the answer to that question is ‘yes,’ what is the black agenda?

These are the questions that black leaders and black people have been discussing more and more since President Obama took office. Last week, Reverend Al Sharpton hosted a leadership summit addressing this very issue. Today a group of black leaders got together on an MSNBC special to talk about this issue in more detail. And many will remember the on-air argument that Tavis Smiley and Rev Sharpton had a few weeks ago about this topic.

Tavis believes that Obama isn’t doing enough. Sharpton believes that Obama need not ‘ballyhoo’ a black agenda. I think most agree, though, that something needs to be done.

With a 16.5% unemployment rate (compared to 9.7% for white Americans), an education system that is under serving black children, higher than average rates of death from diseases like breast cancer, and continued social issues, it is hard to disagree that there is need for some kind of targeted and focused approach to dealing with the issues that affect African-American. But many are divided on whether or not the president is doing enough for black people, whether or not it’s incumbent on him to do anything at all, and what should or shouldn’t be done.

 

Click to read

Leave a comment

Filed under black speakers, Black Women, boyce watkins, Public intellectuals, syracuse university

Letter from Dr. Boyce Watkins – Let Felons Start Voting

Hello my friends,

I hope you’ll try to join us for the Black Leadership Forum being held by the National Action Network in New York City from April 14 – 17 at the Sheraton Hotel & Towers.  I’ll be on a panel with Rev. Al Sharpton, Judge Greg Mathis, Tom Joyner, Roland Martin, Ben Jealous, Charles Ogletree, Marc Morial and a few other very in­teresting people.  If you can’t make it, then I’ll try to get video for you.  In my new video podcast for AOL Black Voices (Called The Dr. Boyce Watkins Show), we’ll cover some of the most intriguing events that take place at the forum and discuss the serious issues that affect our community.

One thing many of us have forgotten is that slavery and involuntary servitude were never fully abolished in the United States. Section 1 of the 13th amendment states that:

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

In other words, we have a world in which it’s OK to treat someone however we wish, as long as we’ve labeled them as a criminal.  This labeling can be arbitrary, since many have decided that African Americans deserve that label far more than others:  We are more likely to be arrested and convicted, even when we commit the same crimes, and we get longer sentences than whites.  Finally, once the inmate has paid their debt to society, they are kept out of society by being denied basic rights such as the right to vote or find a job.  I don’t know about you, but I think this is WRONG, WRONG, WRONG.  No one in their right mind endorses criminal behav­ior, but I would argue that the punishment must fit the crime.  The data imply quite clearly that this is not the case, and that black families pay a disproportionate price for America’s commitment to mass incarceration.

An important issue on which I’d love to have your support is the Democracy Restoration Act, a bill introduced by Russ Feingold and John Conyers.  The bill would give ex-convicts the right to vote.  As many of us know, the disenfranchisement of felons undermines the strength of the African American family, since many of these citi­zens are no longer able to vote, find jobs or re-integrate in a productive way.  This has got to end NOW.  I am asking that every person in our coalition spend 10 minutes or more writing, calling and/or emailing your con­gressman and asking them to support this bill.  If you send a letter, make sure you sign it.  If you send an email, include your name and address so they can be sure that you live in their district.  Follow-up your correspon­dence with a phone call.  I hope you will also consider forwarding this message to other concerned citi­zens.  You can find the contact information for your Congressman by clicking on this link.   Here is a link to find out more about the bill.  Finally, if you don’t like to write, you can get a form letter by clicking here.
I spoke with Rev. Sharpton about the bill this week; he supports it and plans to make it part of the agenda at our Black Leadership Forum in New York on April 17.  I then spoke with the Chairwoman of the National Black Law Students Association, Ms. Melinda Hightower – I feel it is critical that young black attorneys become part of the struggle for equality in the justice system.  Finally, my recent conversation with Mary Washington, the National Executive Director of the Coffee Party Movement (a very strong counter to the Tea Party) was one in which I clearly predicated my involvement on their showing genuine support for issues that affect the black commu­nity.  We would really like your support and hope that you understand the importance of ensuring that ex-convicts have the right to become members of our society once they’ve paid their debt.  It is hard to maintain the integrity of the black family if the daddies and mamas who make mistakes are not able to make themselves into better Americans. In the American Revolution, they often cried, "No taxation without representation."  Well, there are millions of felons who pay taxes like the rest of us, so I would argue that they deserve the right to be represented in Congress and the White House.  Millions of African Americans are denied access to the Ameri­can dream because they’ve been convicted of a crime, and their children often pay the price.

If you wish to become actively involved as an organizer or have special skills, interest or resources that might be helpful to this cause, please reply to this message and I can have it forwarded to our Chief Organizer, Jazelle Reed.  We welcome anyone who’d like to help us to achieve this important objective and encourage everyone to get involved.  I take this issue personally because I’ve seen up close the devastation that incar­ceration has had on my own family (my father and older brother figure both went to prison), and I want this madness to stop.

Be well, stay strong, and be educated,

Dr. Boyce
BoyceWatkins.com

1 Comment

Filed under black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

Black Bloggers on Newsone.com – 3/11/10

Rev. Al Sharpton

Rev. Al Sharpton

Founder and President of the National Action Network (NAN), Rev Sharpton is one of most-renowned civil rights leaders in the country. Pres Obama called him “the voice of the voiceless and a champion for the downtrodden."

RSS

Dr. Boyce Watkins

Dr. Boyce Watkins

The Bottom Line

Dr. Boyce Watkins is a Professor at Syracuse University and author of the book, "Black American Money." For more information, please visit http://www.YourBlackWorld.com.

RSS

RK Byers

RK Byers

Rich’s Rant

Novelist, screenwriter and edtor RK Byers has spent a career speaking his mind on all topics from sports to news. His work has appeared in consumer publications including The Source and GIANT.

RSS

Elon James White

Elon James White

This Week In Blackness

"This Week in Blackness" is a satirical look at race, politics and pop-culture in a so-called “post-racial” America.

RSS

Warren Ballentine

Warren Ballentine

Radio host Warren Ballentine, "The People’s Attorney," will provide you with all the legal and financial advice you need to keep up in today’s fast-paced world. Visit his website at www.thetruthfighters.com.

Leave a comment

Filed under black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women, boyce watkins

The President’s Grade for 2009

by Dr. Boyce Watkins

The other night on the Oprah Winfrey Christmas special, President Barack Obama made an unwise move. When asked what grade he deserves as president, Obama gave himself a B+. Giving himself a grade was not necessarily the best decision, since there are over 300 million Americans who then realized that they should be giving him grades as well.
So, allow me to be the first to provide our president with a grade for his performance. I’ve been giving grades to college students for the last 16 years, and one thing my students will tell you is that I am fair. My other argument is that I never actually GIVE you a grade; I simply report the grade that you’ve earned.
1) Handling of the Economy (B-): President Obama is better than John McCain ever could have been when it comes to managing our economic downturn. The problem is that while the president has spiraled our deficit out of control, our nation has yet to see any concrete evidence that the economy’s fundamental strength has returned. He has made an enemy out of Wall Street by grandstanding around executive pay issues, but he has lost the backing of Main Street because job losses continue to mount. That’s the problem with always reaching across the isle: Sometimes, you don’t have firm support on either side of it. The president’s inability to translate massive spending into real jobs is going to cost him big time.
2) Management of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan (B): On one hand, the president must face the stern reality that you can’t just walk out of a war in the middle of it. We all know that Bush got us into these messes, and Obama must get us out. At the same time, Obama pledged to get us out of the wars faster than he is actually doing it, and it is incredibly awkward for a man to accept a Nobel Peace Prize while simultaneously escalating the troop presence in an occupied country. Sure Obama didn’t give himself the Nobel Prize, but he still must be held accountable.

 

Click to read.

Leave a comment

Filed under black professors, Black Scholars, black speakers, Black Women

The Financial Value of Rihanna’s Pain

by Dr. Boyce Watkins 

I hated what Chris Brown did to Rihanna. I was angered, disappointed and irritated by the fact that many are quick to forgive egregious behavior on the part of celebrities, and a hit song can forgive all sins. At the same time, celebs are just like the rest of us, full of complexities that the world may never come to understand. Rihanna has walked away from Chris and she is now telling the entire world how bad of a man he is, and we’re all taking her side.

The problem for Rihanna, however, is that her actions aren’t making much sense.

Rihanna’s recent whirlwind media tour has included the likes of ABC News, MTV and other major media outlets. Throughout this tour, she has allowed the world to enter into her dark reflection on the relationship she had with Chris Brown, with that reflection seeming to have almost no productive purpose. I am not sure why the he-say/she-say between two 19-year old kids should be the concern of the nation. But then again, I am sitting here writing about it, so I am as guilty as everyone else.

 

Click to read.

Leave a comment

Filed under Black News, black professors, Black Scholars, Black Women

Dr Boyce Speaks on Serena Williams

Stop hating on black female athletes

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, Syracuse University

MSNBC’s TheGrio.com 

Black women are too aggressive. They are vicious, nasty, neck-swinging, over-sexed, amazons who utilize every available opportunity to tell off anyone in their path. They hate black men and they even manage to find creative ways to hate one another. We’ve now come up with a one-dimensional way of describing an incredibly diverse group around the world. That is what the world does to black women, and it is the same thing they do with black men. Personally, I’m getting sick of it.

In our natural aversion to such blatantly biased characterizations like the one presented in the first paragraph, we then go to the other extreme: Black women are all perfect, beautiful, loving, enlightened creatures who can do no wrong. All the problems of the black family belong solely to those "trifling brothers who just can’t get it together," and even when black women appear to be wrong, it’s just because the rest of us "are too weak to handle strong and intelligent sistuhs." Sorry my friends, stereotyping is wrong, even when it works in your favor.

Serena Williams’ tirade during the US Open on Saturday was offensive and sad to watch. She embarrassed herself and her family by threatening to "shove the ball down the f***ing throat" of a line judge during an internationally televised event. At the same time, Serena was in an extremely tense situation, the judge made a horrible call, and this was one of the biggest matches of her career. The judge had no business making that kind of call at that time, especially one that was ultimately incorrect. Serena simply said exactly what I certainly would have been thinking myself.

Click to read.

Leave a comment

Filed under black speakers, Black Women

Kanye, Serena and the Cost of Getting Ugly

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, Syracuse University 

When Kanye West stood on NBC four years ago and said "George Bush doesn’t care about black people," I applauded. When he acted a fool on stage after not receiving some award he deserved, I laughed. When he came out with that really weird CD after dealing with personal crises involving the loss of his mother and break up with his fiance, I sincerely felt for him (but never bought the album).
But after Kanye’s stunt last night on the MTV Video Music Awards, I wanted to slap him. Damn brother, that was just pathetic. When Beyonce told you she liked men with big egos, you surely put that theory to the test.

Kanye West’s decision to bum rush the stage and yank the mike out of the hand of Taylor Swift, a 19-year old woman winning her first award has finally certified him as the jackass that everyone thought he might be. I have been a big supporter of West, and I still support him to a point. He brings some degree of intelligence to hip hopthat the industry has needed for a long time. But the truth is that his actions last night were rooted in extreme selfishness and horribly arrogant behavior. Not good for Kanye, nor anyone else.
This must have been "The weekend the black folks went wild," because Serena Williams had an equally problematic outburst at the US Open. After a very bad call by one of the judges, Serena felt the need to offer to shove the ball down the "f*cking throat" of the woman for making her mistake. OK sistuh-girl, does the judge really need to have the ball shoved down her throat?

 

Click to read.

Leave a comment

Filed under Black Scholars, Black Women

My friend Michel Martin of NPR Speaks on Black Wealth

Click the image to listen!

Leave a comment

Filed under African Americans, Black Men, Black Money, Black Scholars, Black Women

Dr Boyce in Essence Magazine

Dr Boyce Watkins, Finance Professor at Syracuse University, appears in the March issue of Essence Magazine to discuss money and investing in light of the 2009 Financial Crisis.

Dr. Watkins is one of the world’s leading experts in Finance and was the only African American in the world to earn a PhD in Finance during the year 2002.  For more information, please visit www.BoyceWatkins.com.

Dr Watkins has been in Essence Magazine many times in the past, particularly due to his popular book, “Financial Lovemaking 101: Merging Assets with Your Partner in Ways that Feel Good.”

Leave a comment

Filed under African Americans, Black Men, Black Money, Black Scholars, Black Women

My Friend Kevin Powell Speaks on Violence Against Women

Writer’s note:

Given all the hype and controversy around Chris Brown’s alleged beating of Rihanna, I feel compelled to post this essay I originally wrote in late 2007, so that some of us can have an honest jump off point to discuss male violence against females, to discuss the need for ownership of past pains and traumas, to discuss the critical importance of therapy and healing. Let us pray for Rihanna, first and foremost, because no one deserves to be beaten, or beaten up. No one. And let us also pray that Chris Brown gets the help he needs by way of long-term counseling and alternative definitions of manhood rooted in nonviolence, real love, and, alas, real peace. And let us not forget that Rihanna and Chris Brown happen to be major pop stars, hence all the media coverage, blogs, etc. Violence against women and girls happen every single day on this planet without any notice from most of us. Until we begin to address that hard fact, until we all, males and females alike, make a commitment to ending the conditions that create that destructive behavior in the first place, it will not end any time soon. There will be more Rihannas and more Chris Browns.

In my recent travels and political and community work and speeches around the country, it became so very obvious that many American males are unaware of the monumental problems of domestic violence and sexual assault, against women and girls, in our nation. This seems as good a time as any to address this urgent and overlooked issue. Why is it that so few of us actually think about violence against women and girls, or think that it’s our problem? Why do we go on believing it’s all good, even as our sisters, our mothers, and our daughters suffer and a growing number of us participate in the brutality of berating, beating, or killing our female counterparts?

Click to read more.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under African Americans, Black Men, Black Money, Black Scholars, Black Women, Hip Hop, Public intellectuals